Archive for November, 2018

Take a Closer Look at: Annie Leonard, founder of the Story of Stuff Project

Wednesday, November 28th, 2018

Happy Wednesday! This week, we’re taking a closer look at Annie Leonard, Executive Director of Greenpeace USA and the founder of the Story of Stuff Project. Annie Leonard is a tireless fighter for the environment and a longtime leader in the movement to change the way we make, use, and throw away Stuff.

(photo: Erin Lubin)

After interning at the National Wildlife Federation, Leonard began working with Greenpeace on a campaign to ban international waste dumping, traveling around the world to track garbage and hazardous waste sent from developed to less developed countries. “I was sneaking into the factories where it was being disposed, interviewing the workers, taking hair samples and soil samples to prove the environmental health harm,” she later explained in an interview with Cornell University.

 

She later testified to Congress on the topic of international waste trafficking. The work of Greenpeace and other organizations led to the 1992 Basel Convention, an international treaty to protect less developed countries from the dumping of hazardous waste by transnational corporations based in developed countries.

Leonard has over two decades of experience investigating and explaining the environmental and social impacts of our stuff: where it comes from, how it gets to us, and where it goes after we get rid of it. Her film, The Story of Stuff, blossomed into The Story of Stuff Project, which works to empower people around the globe to fight for a more sustainable and just future. The project has built a community of over half a million people and released 8 more videos since The Story of Stuff, which have been viewed over 40 million times and been incorporated into countless school and faith curricula. Simon & Schuster published Leonard’s New York Times bestselling book, The Story of Stuff, which takes a deeper dive into the issues of the film.

 

A hallmark of Leonard’s work with The Story of Stuff Project has been her keen recognition that solving environmental crises requires working across a wide range of movements to fix economic and political systems that are currently dominated by corporations at the expense of people’s health.

Let us know if you’d like to bring Annie Leonard to speak to your organization, campus, or conference!

 

—And that is the story for this week! Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up with the latest from all of our speakers, scientists and change makers!

 

 

 

 

 


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A Closer Look at – Why we give thanks

Wednesday, November 21st, 2018

American’s Thanksgiving celebrations are echoed in many cultures around the world – the desire to give thanks to a bountiful harvest, a moment to reflect on the good things in our lives and our families. If you’ll be joining your family and friends for a meal this weekend, you might be asked ‘what is it that you are thankful for?’. Some will name that which is right in front of them – their family, their friends, a feast to share …

Let me suggest one other thing to be thankful for; that glass of water that sits at your place at the table. Over one billion people will not have access to clean drinking water tomorrow. And the next day.

If you’d like to express your thanks for your good fortune, we recommend checking out and supporting https://water.org/ and help bring clean water to everyone on this good Earth.

Peace.


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Take A Closer Look at — Stormchaser Warren Faidley

Wednesday, November 14th, 2018

Happy Wednesday! This week, we’re going to take a closer look at the ORGINAL storm chaser, Warren Faidley!

Warren Faidley is a prize-winning photojournalist, adventurer and disaster survival expert. He is officially credited as the first, professional storm chasing photojournalist.

 

Warren and his images have appeared worldwide in National Geographic, The Weather Channel, the BBC, Discovery Channel, CNN, Fox News and many more. His photography has also been used for advertising and promotional work for Paul McCartney, Universal Pictures, Sheryl Crow, MTV, The NFL, NASCAR, Warner Bros., and thousands of books, editorial publications, television and social media outlets. A Google search under his unique name shows an average of over 60,000 references.

 

 

Pursuing thousands of individual thunderstorms, tropical cyclones and assorted natural disasters, Warren has survived a mind-numbing number of extreme and deadly situations, including hurricanes winds of 165 mph, tornadoes, lightning bolts, rattle snakes, gunfire, swarming spiders and even angry farmers with rusty pitch forks. Warren began his pursuits at age 12 when he was carried away and nearly killed by a flash flood. A few weeks later he was riding his bike in to the core of violent dust devils.

 

In 1997 he captured the first tornado ever shot on motion picture film. He was a consultant for the motion picture Twister and serves as a disaster survival expert for corporate and media interests. Warren often provides live reports for news media and public safety outlets. He also serves as a volunteer search and rescue / EMS operator. The media often refers to Warren as “America’s Top Storm Chaser.”

 

 

Warren has been an advocate for responsible storm chasing, including a successful mission to expose “fake storm chasing scientists.”

 

Let us know if you’d like to bring Warren Faidley to speak to your organization, campus, or conference!

 

—And that is the story for this week! Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up with the latest from all of our speakers, scientists and change makers!


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Weekly Round Up: A Closer look at Chuck Collins

Wednesday, November 7th, 2018

Happy Wednesday! This week, we’re going to take a closer look at philanthropist/inequality scholar Chuck Collins!

 

 

He is a storyteller and organizer known for his efforts to bridge the national debate about wealth inequality and taxes as well; examining how to build community resilience and make a healthy transition to a sustainable new economy.

 

Chuck was, as he would be the first to tell you, born with the figurative silver spoon in his mouth. Or, to quote the title of one of his books, “Born on Third Base”. But growing up, he quickly learned he hadn’t hit a triple!

 

The great-grandson of Oscar Mayer (yes, that Oscar Mayer) grew up in privilege in suburban Detroit and attended the prestigious Cranbrook School. The 1967 riots in Detroit made young Chuck aware of inequality – racial, economic, etc. As an adolescent, he raised money for guide dogs, got involved in the first Earth Day in 1970, and began trying to make a difference in the world around him.

 

At 26, Chuck did more than talk the talk – he walked the walk, giving away his inheritance to charity.  When his conservative father asked him if he was a Marxist, Chuck replied that he’d rather be though of as a “Gandhian or Christian”.

 

Chuck has worked at the Institute for Community Economics, co-founded United for a Fair Economy, and is currently a senior scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies.

 

He is co-author of several books, including, with Bill Gates Sr., Wealth and Our Commonwealth: Why America Should Tax Accumulated Fortunes, and with Mary Wright, The Moral Measure of the Economy.  His most recent book is 99 to 1: How Wealth Inequality is Wrecking the World and What We Can Do About It.

 

 

—And that is the story for this week! Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up with the latest from all of our speakers, scientists and change makers!


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