Archive for December, 2019

The Happy Holidays edition …

Wednesday, December 18th, 2019

Friends –

Even as we face uncertainty and conflict within the United States, we are reminded of the holidays that remind us of our commonality. Both the Christmas tree and the Hanukkah menorah are reminders of faith, of hope in hopeless situations, of renewal and rebirth. Let 2020 be the year of a world cultural renaissance!

In the meantime, our best wishes to our customers, speakers, and blog readers. We hope you will experience the joy of the season. We’ll be ‘going dark’ until after the first of the year; but as always, we remain available by phone, text, or email should the need arise.


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“Canopy Meg” Lowman – a closer look

Wednesday, December 11th, 2019

Happy Wednesday!  This week, we’re taking a closer look at the woman they call “Canopy Meg” – Dr. Margaret Lowman.

Nicknamed the “real-life Lorax” by National Geographic and “Einstein of the treetops” by Wall Street Journal, Meg Lowman pioneered the science of canopy ecology. For over 30 years, she has designed hot-air balloons and walkways for treetop exploration to solve mysteries in the world’s forests, especially insect pests and ecosystem health. Meg is affectionately called the mother of canopy research as one of the first scientists to explore this eighth continent. She relentlessly works to map the canopy for biodiversity and to champion forest conservation around the world, gaining her start in the rain forests of Australia. Her international network and passion for science have led her into leadership roles where she seeks best practices to solve environmental challenges and serves as a role model to women and minorities in science.

 

Forests are like gigantic stands of lollipops. Since plant sugars are manufactured high overhead, organisms that depend on those sugars, such as insects and birds, are also far from the ground. Until recently, we did not know much about life in the treetops of the world’s forest because their canopies were difficult to reach. Now, thanks to ‘Canopy Meg’s innovations, scientists can climb safely into the “high frontier” to discover some of its wonders. Dr. Lowman has developed an expertise for using different canopy access techniques such as slingshot fired ropes, hot air balloons with sleds, canopy cranes, and canopy walkways.

Dr. Lowman believes in conservation through education which is a very strong theme in her most recent book It’s a Jungle Up There. She has been involved in several JASON Project education programs and numerous other conservation education initiatives. Her books on canopy ecology are not just about her field work but add dimensions in what it’s like to be a woman in a male dominated profession, and what it’s like to be a single parent mom. Her sons co-authored It’s a Jungle Up There and added their insights on how their mother’s career and their family not only survived, but thrived.

 

A leading science innovator, Meg was the founding director of North Carolina’s innovative Nature Research Center at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Meg oversaw the creation, construction, staffing, and programming of this research wing in partnership with the North Carolina University system. She was subsequently hired by the California Academy of Sciences to lead their twenty-first century strategy of integrating research with sustainability initiatives both local and global. She is currently the Executive Director of the TREE Foundation, that pursues and promotes research, education, and exploration to advance the conservation of our planet’s botanical resources and ecosystems dependent upon them.

Let us know if you’d like to bring Dr. Meg Lowman to speak to your organization, campus, or conference! Women’s History Month and Earth Day are coming!

 

—And that is the story for this week! Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up with the latest from all of our speakers, scientists and change makers!

 


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Paul Watson- Sea Shepherd Founder, Ocean Warrior – a closer look

Wednesday, December 4th, 2019

Happy Wednesday! This week, , let’s take a look at Sea Shepherd founder Paul Watson, as it’s Paul’s birthday!

 

With Paul’s international legal issues behind him, he has returned to the lecture circuit speak out for the world’s oceans. A few things to know about Paul:

 

  • -Founding member of Greenpeace, left when the organization rejected his call for direct action.
  • -Founded the Sea Shepherd Society to take direct action against illegal whaling, baby seal harvesting, etc.
  • -Japan is still trying to put him in jail for his successful campaign to end whaling in the Southern Ocean.
  • -The campaigns were televised on ANIMAL PLANET’s “Whale Wars”.
  • -Author of six books, including Earthforce! An Earth Warrior’s Guide to Strategy
  • -Sank several whaling ships while anchored at port (no injuries) in Iceland.
  • -Harassed many Japanese whalers that were illegally hunting in the Southern Ocean (below)

 

The documentary film WATSON, about his life and times, has just been released!

 

Paul Watson received the Jules Verne Award, becoming  the second person after Captain Jacques Cousteau to be honored with a Jules Verne Award dedicated to environmentalists and adventurers. Paul received the Asociación de Amigos del Museo de Anclas Philippe Cousteau: Defense of Marine Life Award, in recognition of his merits achieved by the work done in defense of marine life. He was inducted into the US Animal Rights Hall of Fame for his outstanding contributions to animal liberation.

20:08 GMT +11, December 26, 2008. The M/V Steve Irwin has a close encounter with the Kaiko Maru, a spotter ship in the Japanese whaling fleet. Sea Shepherd crew members throw butyric acid (an organic, non-toxic “stink bomb”) onto the deck of the Kaiko Maru.
Photo: Eric Cheng / Sea Shepherd Conservation Society

 

Let us know if you’d like to bring Captain Paul Watson to speak to your organization, campus, or conference!

 

—And that is the story for this week! Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up with the latest from all of our speakers, scientists and change makers!

 


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